From the Bookshelf: Linking the Histories of Slavery – North America and Its Borderlands

Linking the Histories of Slavery: North America and Its Borderlands Edited by Bonnie Martin and James F. Brooks (cross-posted at the Borderlands History Blog) Students and scholars of the North American Borderlands of a certain vintage will surely have read James F. Brooks’ Captives and Cousins. In that seminal work Brooks used the framework of…

From the Bookshelf: Joseph Smith Papers – Council of 50 Minutes

  Administrative Records Vol. 1, Council of Fifty Minutes, March 1844-January 1846 The Joseph Smith Papers Salt Lake City: Church Historians Press, 2016 Available for PURCHASE now. The Council of 50 Minute Book; or The Mormons Look West: or the Mormons get the heck out of Dodge; or the Mormons Declare the United States a…

From the Bookshelf: James F. Brooks – Mesa of Sorrows

Mesa of Sorrows: A History of the Awat’ovi Massacre James F. Brooks W. W. Norton Press, 2016.   Back in February, I was fortunate to host James F. Brooks on BYU campus to give the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies’ annual Annaley Naegle Redd Lecture. A Professor of History & Anthropology at the University of…

From the Bookshelf: Rosenthal – Reimagining Indian Country

Nicolas G. Rosenthal. Reimagining Indian Country: Native American Migration & Identity in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2012.  Readers may be catching on to the fact that I am a sucker for scholarship that, to paraphrase David Weber, takes the familiar and makes it strange. For this reason, I…

From the Bookshelf: Colombi and Brooks – Keystone Nations: Indigenous Peoples and Salmon Across the North Pacific

Keystone Nations: Indigenous Peoples and Salmon Across the North Pacific, edited by Benedict J. Colombi and James F. Brooks, thematically hit on so many of my interests that I couldn’t help but get my hands on it. As I have mentioned before, I I love scholarship that takes old topics and revitalizes them by approaching…

On Comparative Methodology, My Book Manuscript, and Haake’s The State, Removal and Indigenous Peoples in the United States and Mexico

Back when I was working on my dissertation, I was put in contact with a scholar in Australia – Claudia B. Haake – as her recent monograph was relevant to my research in its content and methodology. Her book, The State, Removal and Indigenous Peoples in the United States and Mexico, 1620-2000, is a comparative…